Posted on 16th June 2016 / 885
Industry Type : Transport
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Ruins and Remnants

A magnificent seven-arched railway viaduct built to carry the Alnmouth to Alnwick railway.

It opened in 1850 to both freight and passenger traffic.

The Cawledge Viaduct carried a 135ft double track over the Cawledge Burn – it wasn’t an easy build! The task was given to Robert Stephenson and work started in August 1848. The viaduct took two years to build and nearly £35k. The successful  contractor was Rush & Lawton.

Passenger operations included direct Newcastle to Alnwick services, as well as regular shuttle runs between Alnmouth and Alnwick.

The Alnwick branch was rationalised in 1965 after escaping Beeching’s axe. One line was lifted and signalling control transferred to Alnmouth. However this was only a temporary reprieve. Passenger services were withdrawn in January 1968 and goods traffic ended on 7th October. Soon after, the railway was cut in two by the A1 bypass.

Amazingly, the viaduct doesn’t seem to be a listed structure??!!

However, in 1995, the Aln Valley Railway Society was formed with the intention of reviving the line. A station has been erected in a field on the east side of the A1 and working hard towards opening a single track – with a foot/cyclepath running alongside.  A grand reopening is hoped for 2020. Some maintenance and drainage work will be required to Cawledge Viaduct as part of the project.

Read more about the Aln Valley Railway Appeal – HERE!

Until that day, the former track bed can be walked along and a dangerous scramble (not advised) is the only way to really see the beauty of the 53ft tall masonry beauty. Check out the handy map for walkers – HERE!

 

Cawledge, Northumberland

Cawledge Viaduct

A magnificent seven-arched railway viaduct built to carry the Alnmouth to Alnwick railway.

It opened in 1850 to both freight and passenger traffic.

The Cawledge Viaduct carried a 135ft double track over the Cawledge Burn – it wasn’t an easy build! The task was given to Robert Stephenson and work started in August 1848. The viaduct took two years to build and nearly £35k. The successful  contractor was Rush & Lawton.

Passenger operations included direct Newcastle to Alnwick services, as well as regular shuttle runs between Alnmouth and Alnwick.

The Alnwick branch was rationalised in 1965 after escaping Beeching’s axe. One line was lifted and signalling control transferred to Alnmouth. However this was only a temporary reprieve. Passenger services were withdrawn in January 1968 and goods traffic ended on 7th October. Soon after, the railway was cut in two by the A1 bypass.

Amazingly, the viaduct doesn’t seem to be a listed structure??!!

However, in 1995, the Aln Valley Railway Society was formed with the intention of reviving the line. A station has been erected in a field on the east side of the A1 and working hard towards opening a single track – with a foot/cyclepath running alongside.  A grand reopening is hoped for 2020. Some maintenance and drainage work will be required to Cawledge Viaduct as part of the project.

Read more about the Aln Valley Railway Appeal – HERE!

Until that day, the former track bed can be walked along and a dangerous scramble (not advised) is the only way to really see the beauty of the 53ft tall masonry beauty. Check out the handy map for walkers – HERE!

 

Cawledge, Northumberland

Cawledge Viaduct
Industry Type : Transport
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Ruins and Remnants
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