Results 1 - 30 of 30 Page 1 of 1
Results per-page: 10 | 20 | 50 | 100

Black Dog Shaft – Wheal Busy

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: 6th August 2015

Wheal not so busy?! Although part of an extremely productive mining sett, this particular shaft saw little action. This pumping engine house was built in 1872, but the engine never made it into the engine house and the mine closed in 1873. The engine was eventually broken up for scrap next to the engine house. The engine house was all but destroyed by US marines as demolition practice prior to the D-Day landings. Now, the remaining walls are most precarious and crumbling away. In terms of mineralogy, the site was mined for Copper, Tin and Arsenic. The mines of Wheal…

Pleasley Colliery Museum

Relevance: 94%      Posted on: 4th January 2016

Pleasley Colliery still retains its headstocks, engine houses and steam winders! One was installed in 1904 by Lilleshall Co and the other in 1922 by Markham & Co The Pit was sunk in the 1870s and produced coal until 1983. Pleasley Colliery is now a Scheduled Ancient Monument and has become a wonderful mining heritage site. The engine-house roofs and the chimney have been renovated and the winders have been restored by members of the Friends of Pleasley Pit preservation group. There is also a splendid Pit Café and an entire nature reserve to enjoy! Check out the Pleasley Pit…

Avoncroft Windmill

Relevance: 93%      Posted on: 11th August 2015

This scrumptious 19th century post mill is one of only three surviving examples from the English Midlands. Avoncroft Windmill was rescued from Danzey Green near Tanworth-in-Arden in 1969 and reconstructed at Avoncroft Museum. They have monthly sailing days when you can see it in action! I wanna be a windmill volunteer! Check out their events programme Here! Stoke Heath, Bromsgrove, Midlands, B60 4JR.

Newcomen Engine, Dartmouth

Relevance: 88%      Posted on: 26th August 2015

They say that the Newcomen Engine, Dartmouth, is the oldest preserved steam engine in the world! Restored in 1963/4 by the Newcomen Society, this engine (mostly of 1725) is very similar to Newcomen’s earliest 1712 model. It was originally installed at the Griff Colliery near Nuneaton in 1725, but it didn’t stay there. 4 years later it was transferred to Oakthorpe Colliery in Measham and in 1821, it was moved to an engine house at Hawkesbury Canal Junction near Coventry, where it stayed until 1913. Each job required pumping water, whether it was out of the depths of a mine…

Wheal Ellen

Relevance: 88%      Posted on: 14th December 2015

Wheal Ellen is the only engine house in Cornwall with a castellated stack. It probably operated from 1826 to 1862 and produced primarily copper, with some lead and zinc. Situated in the Tywarnhayle Valley where metalliferous mining was prolific! Wheal Ellen Mine is thought to have turn-out over 2,500 tons of copper, so this engine house was built in 1866 with a view to re-working the mine, but it seems that it didn’t see much action, because the engine was never installed! Such exuberant design is a proud shout-out that Copper was King in Cornwall! Mines in the region include…

Save Enderby House

Relevance: 87%      Posted on: 17th November 2015

The Enderby Group seeks to preserve Enderby House on the Greenwich Peninsula and to publicise and record the telecoms and cable-making heritage of Enderby Wharf and Greenwich, south east London. Described as one of the saddest sights on Greenwich’s Thames Path, left vandalised and wrecked, neglected by developers who don’t seem to have a clue what to do with it. This is where the world’s first telegraph cables were made, with work still taking part in a small corner of the site. Without Enderby House, there may well have been no phones, and no internet. It’s a hugely-overlooked piece of…

Catalyst

Relevance: 87%      Posted on: 2nd March 2017

Catalyst is a Science Discovery Centre focusing on chemistry and the history of the chemical industry. It is devoted to chemistry and how the products of chemistry are used in everyday life. Catalyst is the ideal treat for kids regardless of age! It's an action-packed family attraction with an excellent educational focus. Enjoy panoramic views across Cheshire from the rooftop Observatory reached by a scenic glass lift, or visit Scientrific, or Birth of an Industry. There is also a unique careers gallery, where pupils can gain valuable insight into careers in science through interactive displays and DVD Clips. Check out…

Northampton and Lamport Railway

Relevance: 85%      Posted on: 29th January 2017

Northampton and Lamport Railway is a steam and heritage diesel tourist railway in the heart of the Northamptonshire countryside. The Northampton and Lamport Railway is approximately 1½ miles of running track alongside the Brampton Valley Way, a 14 mile linear part from Northampton to Market Harborough, you can not only ride one of our trains along the former line but walk along and watch the steam and diesel engines in action. Check out their website – HERE!   Pitsford Rd, Chapel Brampton, Northampton, NN6 8BA This is just a seed page – please add what you know and help it to…

Stotfold Watermill

Relevance: 81%      Posted on: 17th January 2016

The Stotfold Watermill has the widest overshot waterwheel in the country! It is also the only working mill left in Stotfold and is a grade II listed! The incredible water wheel is a 4.4 metre wide overshot corn mill waterwheel. The Mill was fully restored after being burnt down on 15 December 1992. It is currently open to the public with a tea room on alternate weekends in season (March to October) and on special event weekends. It stands on the River Ivel and is one of only 4 mills in Stotfold. Nobody is certain of the exact date, but…

New life for New Mill

Relevance: 80%      Posted on: 4th February 2016

New Mill is a Grade II listed post mill at Cross-in-Hand, near Heathfield, East Sussex. It was the last windmill working commercially (by wind) in Sussex, ceasing in 1969. Originally built for a site elsewhere in the early 1800s, New Mill was moved twice to reach its current site! It arrived here (as New Mill) in 1868 by Samuel Medhurst. It joined an older mill on this site. New Mill is a post mill on a two-storey roundhouse. It has four patent sails carried on a cast iron windshaft and was winded by a tailpole-mounted fantail. After moderations over the…

Restoring SS Freshspring

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: 21st March 2016

Built in 1946, SS Freshspring is the last of 14 Fresh-Class water carriers, all of which were 121 feet in length and were powered by a triple-expansion steam engine! She is recognised as being of national historical significance on the National Register of Historic Vessels. The SS Freshspring Society (a not-for-profit organisation) aim to return SS Freshspring to operation – preserving the past and inspiring knowledge for the future. The Steam Ship Freshspring had to replenish Naval ships with fresh water for use in their boilers. She also acted as a fire tender when required! SS Freshspring will be sympathetically…

Fritchley Railway Tunnel

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: 18th October 2015

Fritchley Railway Tunnel was recently recognised as "the earliest surviving railway tunnel in the world" – boom! It was part of Benjamin Outram’s Butterley Gangroad Railway-line, that he designed to transport limestone, from the quarry at Crich, to the limekilns above Butterley Tunnel – via the newly opened Cromford canal, in 1793. Fritchley Railway Tunnel was built for a 3ft 10 inch tramway, initially horse-led, but later (1813) by a small steam engine designed by the famous William Brunton of the Butterley Works. Alterations were made circa 1840, but she saw a lot of action. Her innards are said to…

Shirley Windmill

Relevance: 72%      Posted on: 22nd March 2016

Shirley Windmill is 1 of the last windmills to be built in this country and 1 of 4 open to the public in Greater London! Shirley is a Tower Mill and the only one in Croydon! She was built in 1854 to replace an earlier Post Mill! The post mill (which burnt down) was built in 1808 or 9, so there has been over 200 years of windmill occupation here! Research suggests that a post mill, previously at West Ham,  moved to Shirley c.1809, so may have been at this site. It ceased working in about 1890, but most of…

Birnbeck Pier

Relevance: 71%      Posted on: 31st December 2015

Birnbeck Pier is a unique structure – it’s the only British pier that links the mainland to an island. It was designed by Eugenius Birch and opened in 1867. Birnbeck Pier, known locally as the Old Pier, stands on the North Somerset coastline at Weston-super-Mare and is grade II listed and on the Buildings at Risk Register. The gothic toll house and pierhead buildings were designed by local architect Hans Price. The pier has sadly been closed to the public since 1994. Over its lifetime it has enjoyed mixed fortunes – in its heyday, it was the Victorian equivalent of…

Tarka Valley Railway

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: 21st September 2015

The Tarka Valley narrow gauge railway, Torrington, Devon, was originally opened in 1872 and over the years supported several major local industries including the Marland Brick and Clay Works. In 1925 the gauge was relaid to standard gauge and became known as the North Devon and Cornwall Junction Light Railway (ND&CJLR); but it closed in 1965.   In 2013 the Tarka Trail Valley Railway Group obtained planning permission to reinstate the railway from the Torrington Station, now known as Puffing Billy, towards Bideford up to the first iron bridge. The installation of the railway line will not affect the current…

Great Laxey Wheel

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: 25th August 2015

The Great Laxey Wheel (aka Lady Isabella) is the largest working waterwheel in the world! (with a diameter of 22m (72.5 feet). A brilliant example of Victorian engineering she was built in 1854 by Robert Casement to pump water from the Glen Mooar part of the Laxey mines. Today a climb to the top is rewarded with panoramic views across the Laxey Valley. It is not a conventional water wheel! Water is collected in a cistern which is above the level of the top of the wheel using the power of the inverted syphon in a closed pipe system; thus…

Longbridge Mill

Relevance: 65%      Posted on: 11th May 2016

There is evidence that a mill existed on this site 800 years ago! The earliest references to 'John the Miller' and a mill on this site date back to 1274. By 1316 there was a mention of the mill at Sherfield on Loddon being a watermill. However, Longbridge Mill (the building you see now) is more likely of 15th century origin and the granary was added in the 16th century. At the height of its success, 'Lodgridge Mill' at 'Shirefield-upon-Loddon' was a major industry in the area, with 2 water-wheels powering 4 sets of milling stones. There is still a…

Wellbrook Beetling Mill

Relevance: 64%      Posted on: 26th November 2016

Wellbrook Beetling Mill is one of the last water powered beetling mills in the UK. It is now owned by the National Trust. Wellbrook Beetling Mill was part of a large bleach works originally built in 1764 by Hugh and Sam Faulkner from Cookstown. Seven beetling machines are powered by a breastshot water wheel. The machinery is in working order and can be seen in action! The mill takes its power from the fast flowing Ballinderry River. A short distance from the road you can see the mill race and the flume - the wooden trough carried on piers of…

Cwm Ciprwth Copper Mine

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: 14th December 2015

Cwm Ciprwth Copper Mine may be remote, but its remains won’t disappoint. Mining records date Cwm Ciprwth Copr Mine to 1850,  but it didn’t last long. It seems to be out of action circa 1894. However, Copper has been won from the Snowdonia area since the Bronze Age, with evidence of the activity from 4000 years ago found in the east of Beddgelert at the Sygun Copper Mine and the Great Orme. Of course, the Bronze Age has been called the Bronze Age because the people of that time were mixing small quantities (about 12%) of Tin with the Copper…

Trouble at Heage Mill

Relevance: 53%      Posted on: 9th November 2015

When the millwrights carried out maintenance at the grade II* windmill (see Heage Windmill) in late summer 2015, they discovered that some major structural components were showing signs of severe wet rot.   The rotted members were not replaced in the 2002 restoration programme since, in accordance with guidelines set by English Heritage, they were judged by the restoration millwrights to be suitable for continued use. The members in question are made from very large section timbers, exposed to the elements at all times, and form part of the support structure for the windshaft and also of the fan tail…

Crossness Sewage Pumping Station

Relevance: 52%      Posted on: 21st September 2015

Think London, think open sewers, think Joseph Bazalgette - and that’s where Crossness Pumping Station comes in! It officially opened in 1865 and originally called the Southern Outfall Works. The Great Stink of 1858 was the breaking point for parliament and action was taken. Cholera reached England in 1832 and it took them 10 years to identify the cause as contaminated drinking water and even longer to deal with the problem effectively. Bazalgette put forward the best poo-plan and they embarked upon the herculean task. The plan was to move the effluent eastwards along a series of interconnecting sewers that…

Tees Cottage Pumping Station

Relevance: 52%      Posted on: 12th November 2016

Tees Cottage Pumping Station has two completely original pumping engines in full working order. It is a Victorian waterworks in Darlington and a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Tees Cottage Pumping Station, in the North East of England, began supplying water to Darlington in 1849. The engines are housed in their own purpose built buildings, dating from 1847 to 1901, in themselves superb examples of Victorian architecture. The engines and buildings are carefully maintained, preserved and run by volunteers, supported by the site owner, Northumbrian Water. The engines are displayed running under their pumping load on about four weekends each year. One engine…

Protect Ashburton Station and Track Bed

Relevance: 51%      Posted on: 12th September 2015

Ashburton railway station finally closed in 1971, it was the terminus of a branch line of the GWR from Totnes. It sports a rare example of the Brunel-style Overall Roof, which is of an iconic and attractive design and spans the track and platforms. This unique terminus building was built before 1872 when the line from Totnes to Ashburton was opened. At some point it became a garage (Station Garage), which could be closed in the future and the building and the area around it redeveloped. It is not a listed building, but the assemblage of railway structures as a…

Wanlockhead Beam Engine

Relevance: 50%      Posted on: 30th November 2015

Built circa 1870, the Wanlockhead Beam Engine is the only water-bucket pumping engine still in situ in the UK today. The Straitsteps Lead Mine was opened up in circa 1675 by Sir James Stampfield. The hills here also contained gold! It was a vertical shaft descending to the lead vein, which was then followed by horizontal tunnels. Water was a persistent problem and previous solutions were, the hand powered rag pumps and water wheel powered pumping engines. Thankfully, the water-bucket and beam engine pumps arrived in this area as early as 1745. This 1870 pump was powered by the simple…

Hetty Pit Engine

Relevance: 46%      Posted on: 28th October 2016

The Hetty Pit at the Ty Mawr Colliery retains its original steam winding engine. The Barker & Cope of Kidsgrove, Staffordshire, steam winder engine dates from 1875. The Hetty Pit Engine was named after the step daughter of the chairman of the company, Miss Hetty Snow. However, this site had been worked before for its coal and was known as Gyfeillion Pit, Ty Mawr and later (during the 1870s) passed into the hands of the Great Western Colliery Company. The original Ty Mawr Colliery shaft was sunk in 1848 by Evan Hopkins and there on the name applied to the…

Bower Yard Lime Kilns

Relevance: 43%      Posted on: 19th November 2016

The Bower Yard Lime Kilns are some of the oldest lime kilns in the World Heritage Site. A steep inclined plane linked the kilns with the quarries on Benthall Edge. Just a short walk from the iron bridge, the 19th century Bowers Yard industrial site, which includes the lime kilns, a crushing plant and railway sidings with loading facilities, saw thousands of tons of limestone from the Benthall Edge Quarries burnt to produce lime for the region's busy construction industry. The lime kilns were originally built during the mid 1800s and operated until the1870s, after which it fell into disrepair. The…

The Ails of Aizlewood’s Mill

Relevance: 43%      Posted on: 12th September 2017

The grade II listed Aizlewood's Mill in Sheffield was a corn mill. It was built in 1847 (or 1861 depending on source) by William Flockton of Sheffield for John Aizlewood. It was derelict, unsafe and ear-marked for demolition, but it was saved and now Aizlewood's Mill is a prestigious six-storey 19th century Flour Mill restored and refurbished into a fully managed business centre. The excellent design of this building secured the Design of the Year Award in 1991! How the Mill was Won: Having fought off attempts by Sheffield City Council officers to have the building demolished as unsafe, it took…

King Edward Mine

Relevance: 35%      Posted on: 9th August 2016

King Edward Mine is unlike all other tin mines, it was used for teaching practical mining from 1897 until 2005 – and still has the 1st year miner's survey course there occasionally! Home to the only full size set of Californian stamps in existence in the UK and probably in Europe! King Edward Mine is a Cornish tin mine located at the eastern part of the South Condurrow Mine, which was abandoned about 1890. It was re-opened in 1897 and developed as a fully operational training mine, by the mighty Camborne School of Mines. The plan was that the tin…

An Obvious Inclination

Relevance: 20%      Posted on: 13th July 2015

Inclined planes, put simply - are purpose-built slopes. It seems like a simple or even obvious requirement to address the height differences on a transport system, but these were devised in an age when they were dealing with heavy loads and limited by available technology. Long before health and safety considerations, these guys had a job to do, a problem to overcome and the mighty inclined plane saved the day on numerous occasions. A to B had never been so much effort. The mining industries and the canals pioneered the use of the inclined plane. Even the earliest rail in…

GooseyGoo Glossary

Relevance: 17%      Posted on: 7th October 2015

[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748312735{margin-top: 50px !important;margin-bottom: 0px !important;padding-top: 50px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_separator color="custom" border_width="2" accent_color="#e0e0e0"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748509768{background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]   Welcome to the GooseyGoo dictionary of industrial history! Some are quite funny, others are great for Scrabble and a few are just weird!  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748231841{margin-top: 0px !important;margin-bottom: 50px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_separator color="custom" border_width="2" accent_color="#e0e0e0"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_tta_accordion color="white" spacing="1" gap="1" c_icon="chevron" active_section="32" collapsible_all="true"][vc_tta_section i_icon_fontawesome="fa fa-anchor" add_icon="true" title=" A (aye)" tab_id="1444220333069-8cf18613-6291"][vc_column_text]Absolute block signalling A British signalling scheme designed to ensure the safe operation of a railway by allowing only one train to occupy a defined section of track (block) at a time   Adhesion railway The most common type of railway,…