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Crossness Sewage Pumping Station

Relevance: 52%      Posted on: 21st September 2015

Think London, think open sewers, think Joseph Bazalgette - and that’s where Crossness Pumping Station comes in! It officially opened in 1865 and originally called the Southern Outfall Works. The Great Stink of 1858 was the breaking point for parliament and action was taken. Cholera reached England in 1832 and it took them 10 years to identify the cause as contaminated drinking water and even longer to deal with the problem effectively. Bazalgette put forward the best poo-plan and they embarked upon the herculean task. The plan was to move the effluent eastwards along a series of interconnecting sewers that…

Tees Cottage Pumping Station

Relevance: 52%      Posted on: 12th November 2016

Tees Cottage Pumping Station has two completely original pumping engines in full working order. It is a Victorian waterworks in Darlington and a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Tees Cottage Pumping Station, in the North East of England, began supplying water to Darlington in 1849. The engines are housed in their own purpose built buildings, dating from 1847 to 1901, in themselves superb examples of Victorian architecture. The engines and buildings are carefully maintained, preserved and run by volunteers, supported by the site owner, Northumbrian Water. The engines are displayed running under their pumping load on about four weekends each year. One engine…

Protect Ashburton Station and Track Bed

Relevance: 51%      Posted on: 12th September 2015

Ashburton railway station finally closed in 1971, it was the terminus of a branch line of the GWR from Totnes. It sports a rare example of the Brunel-style Overall Roof, which is of an iconic and attractive design and spans the track and platforms. This unique terminus building was built before 1872 when the line from Totnes to Ashburton was opened. At some point it became a garage (Station Garage), which could be closed in the future and the building and the area around it redeveloped. It is not a listed building, but the assemblage of railway structures as a…

Wanlockhead Beam Engine

Relevance: 50%      Posted on: 30th November 2015

Built circa 1870, the Wanlockhead Beam Engine is the only water-bucket pumping engine still in situ in the UK today. The Straitsteps Lead Mine was opened up in circa 1675 by Sir James Stampfield. The hills here also contained gold! It was a vertical shaft descending to the lead vein, which was then followed by horizontal tunnels. Water was a persistent problem and previous solutions were, the hand powered rag pumps and water wheel powered pumping engines. Thankfully, the water-bucket and beam engine pumps arrived in this area as early as 1745. This 1870 pump was powered by the simple…

Hetty Pit Engine

Relevance: 46%      Posted on: 28th October 2016

The Hetty Pit at the Ty Mawr Colliery retains its original steam winding engine. The Barker & Cope of Kidsgrove, Staffordshire, steam winder engine dates from 1875. The Hetty Pit Engine was named after the step daughter of the chairman of the company, Miss Hetty Snow. However, this site had been worked before for its coal and was known as Gyfeillion Pit, Ty Mawr and later (during the 1870s) passed into the hands of the Great Western Colliery Company. The original Ty Mawr Colliery shaft was sunk in 1848 by Evan Hopkins and there on the name applied to the…

Bower Yard Lime Kilns

Relevance: 43%      Posted on: 19th November 2016

The Bower Yard Lime Kilns are some of the oldest lime kilns in the World Heritage Site. A steep inclined plane linked the kilns with the quarries on Benthall Edge. Just a short walk from the iron bridge, the 19th century Bowers Yard industrial site, which includes the lime kilns, a crushing plant and railway sidings with loading facilities, saw thousands of tons of limestone from the Benthall Edge Quarries burnt to produce lime for the region's busy construction industry. The lime kilns were originally built during the mid 1800s and operated until the1870s, after which it fell into disrepair. The…

The Ails of Aizlewood’s Mill

Relevance: 43%      Posted on: 12th September 2017

The grade II listed Aizlewood's Mill in Sheffield was a corn mill. It was built in 1847 (or 1861 depending on source) by William Flockton of Sheffield for John Aizlewood. It was derelict, unsafe and ear-marked for demolition, but it was saved and now Aizlewood's Mill is a prestigious six-storey 19th century Flour Mill restored and refurbished into a fully managed business centre. The excellent design of this building secured the Design of the Year Award in 1991! How the Mill was Won: Having fought off attempts by Sheffield City Council officers to have the building demolished as unsafe, it took…

King Edward Mine

Relevance: 35%      Posted on: 9th August 2016

King Edward Mine is unlike all other tin mines, it was used for teaching practical mining from 1897 until 2005 – and still has the 1st year miner's survey course there occasionally! Home to the only full size set of Californian stamps in existence in the UK and probably in Europe! King Edward Mine is a Cornish tin mine located at the eastern part of the South Condurrow Mine, which was abandoned about 1890. It was re-opened in 1897 and developed as a fully operational training mine, by the mighty Camborne School of Mines. The plan was that the tin…

An Obvious Inclination

Relevance: 20%      Posted on: 13th July 2015

Inclined planes, put simply - are purpose-built slopes. It seems like a simple or even obvious requirement to address the height differences on a transport system, but these were devised in an age when they were dealing with heavy loads and limited by available technology. Long before health and safety considerations, these guys had a job to do, a problem to overcome and the mighty inclined plane saved the day on numerous occasions. A to B had never been so much effort. The mining industries and the canals pioneered the use of the inclined plane. Even the earliest rail in…

GooseyGoo Glossary

Relevance: 17%      Posted on: 7th October 2015

[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748312735{margin-top: 50px !important;margin-bottom: 0px !important;padding-top: 50px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_separator color="custom" border_width="2" accent_color="#e0e0e0"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748509768{background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]   Welcome to the GooseyGoo dictionary of industrial history! Some are quite funny, others are great for Scrabble and a few are just weird!  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1456748231841{margin-top: 0px !important;margin-bottom: 50px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_separator color="custom" border_width="2" accent_color="#e0e0e0"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_tta_accordion color="white" spacing="1" gap="1" c_icon="chevron" active_section="32" collapsible_all="true"][vc_tta_section i_icon_fontawesome="fa fa-anchor" add_icon="true" title=" A (aye)" tab_id="1444220333069-8cf18613-6291"][vc_column_text]Absolute block signalling A British signalling scheme designed to ensure the safe operation of a railway by allowing only one train to occupy a defined section of track (block) at a time   Adhesion railway The most common type of railway,…