Posted on 13th October 2017 / 421
Industry Type : Transport
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Restored

Barmouth Bridge has one of the longest timber viaducts still in regular use in Britain!

It sits between Morfa Mawddach and Barmouth in Gwynedd and caters for rail, foot and cycle traffic.

Barmouth Bridge is a single-track largely wooden railway viaduct that carries the Cambrian Coast Railway across the River Mawddach. It opened in 1867, and originally had a drawbridge section for tall ships to pass uder, but now has a swing bridge section.

The bridge is a Grade II* listed structure.

It contains 113 wooden trestles supported by a series of cast iron piers. It is one of the longest timber viaducts still standing in Britain.

It was designed by Benjamin Piercy and Henry Conybeare in 1864, and opened on 10 October 1867. Conybeare decided to construct the viaduct from timber as it would be cheaper to import by sea than iron.

The footbridge is owned by Network Rail but an agreement is in place with Gwynedd County Council, who pay for 10% of the annual maintenance in exchange for a license to use the bridge.

Bill Kelly, chief operating officer with Network Rail Wales, said: “We are planning to spend in excess of £20m on this bridge between 2019 and 2024.”

A splendid view and experience.

 

 

Afon, Mawddach, Wales

Barmouth Bridge

Barmouth Bridge has one of the longest timber viaducts still in regular use in Britain!

It sits between Morfa Mawddach and Barmouth in Gwynedd and caters for rail, foot and cycle traffic.

Barmouth Bridge is a single-track largely wooden railway viaduct that carries the Cambrian Coast Railway across the River Mawddach. It opened in 1867, and originally had a drawbridge section for tall ships to pass uder, but now has a swing bridge section.

The bridge is a Grade II* listed structure.

It contains 113 wooden trestles supported by a series of cast iron piers. It is one of the longest timber viaducts still standing in Britain.

It was designed by Benjamin Piercy and Henry Conybeare in 1864, and opened on 10 October 1867. Conybeare decided to construct the viaduct from timber as it would be cheaper to import by sea than iron.

The footbridge is owned by Network Rail but an agreement is in place with Gwynedd County Council, who pay for 10% of the annual maintenance in exchange for a license to use the bridge.

Bill Kelly, chief operating officer with Network Rail Wales, said: “We are planning to spend in excess of £20m on this bridge between 2019 and 2024.”

A splendid view and experience.

 

 

Afon, Mawddach, Wales

Barmouth Bridge
Industry Type : Transport
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Restored
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