Posted on 4th July 2017 / 607
Site Type : Preservation Hub / Campaign
Industry Type : Coal Mining

Clipstone is a 20th century mining village east of Mansfield (Nottinghamshire). In the early 20th century, the Bolsover Mining Company started a new excavation to exploit the ‘Top Hard’ coal seam and in the 1940s the site became one of the most productive UK pits.

The grade II listed Clipstone Colliery Headstocks were the tallest in Europe at the time of construction at 63 metres tall.  The iconic Bauhaus building between the headstocks contains impressive winding machinery which permitted deep shaft mining from the Top Hard seam.

The property is threatened with demolition and a local group has been established to save them and help trigger regeneration in a deprived former mining community.

See the pdf of the plans – A NEW FUTURE FOR CLIPSTONE.

The friends group would like more members to join the campaign and sign the petition to save the buildings.

During the post-war period, the development of a deeper seam required the recon­struction and reorganisation of both underground and surface facilities. In 1953, the old structures and mechanisms were replaced by a pair of new winding engines by Markham and Company of Chesterfield and two headstocks connected by a central powerhouse designed by architects Young and Purves of Manchester.

The winding mechanisms are of ‘Koepe’ type.

Although not in use until the post-war period in the UK, this system had been developed in 1877 by the German mining engineer Frederick Koepe and was well established in Europe. The Koepe system was particularly suitable in deep mines, such as the Clipstone colliery, where it remained in its original configuration until closure in 2003.

Follow the campaign on the Facebook Page – HERE!

A plan to use Nottinghamshire’s Clipstone headstocks – believed to be among the tallest ever built – as the centrepiece of an activity centre will be submitted to the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Supporters said the £25m scheme would bring investment to a deprived area.

Despite calls for them to be demolished, the Save Clipstone Colliery Headstocks group has spent years building support for plans to convert the surviving buildings into a sports and leisure hub with a mile-long, 100-mph zip wire, tethered parachute jumps and indoor skydiving, the centre would transform the area into a tourist destination.

Denise Barraclough, from the group, said: “This has the potential to be a major part of a big tourist offering in the East Midlands, it has been compared to an Eden Project for the East Midlands”.

With an enterprise zone for businesses and an area for affordable housing, it benefits the area in several ways.

After meetings with Heritage Lottery Fund officials, the group is submitting an initial bid for money to support surveys, business plans and feasibility studies. It is hoped an application for full funding could be finalised later in 2017.

Dr David Amos, who studies the cultural impact of mining said: “It’s an important time to consider the social impact of coal mining. The generation which was directly worked down the mines is getting older and what happens now will help determine how it is remembered.”

See BBC News link – HERE!

 

Mansfield Rd, Clipstone, Mansfield, NG21 9EH

Campaigning for Clipstone

Clipstone is a 20th century mining village east of Mansfield (Nottinghamshire). In the early 20th century, the Bolsover Mining Company started a new excavation to exploit the ‘Top Hard’ coal seam and in the 1940s the site became one of the most productive UK pits.

The grade II listed Clipstone Colliery Headstocks were the tallest in Europe at the time of construction at 63 metres tall.  The iconic Bauhaus building between the headstocks contains impressive winding machinery which permitted deep shaft mining from the Top Hard seam.

The property is threatened with demolition and a local group has been established to save them and help trigger regeneration in a deprived former mining community.

See the pdf of the plans – A NEW FUTURE FOR CLIPSTONE.

The friends group would like more members to join the campaign and sign the petition to save the buildings.

During the post-war period, the development of a deeper seam required the recon­struction and reorganisation of both underground and surface facilities. In 1953, the old structures and mechanisms were replaced by a pair of new winding engines by Markham and Company of Chesterfield and two headstocks connected by a central powerhouse designed by architects Young and Purves of Manchester.

The winding mechanisms are of ‘Koepe’ type.

Although not in use until the post-war period in the UK, this system had been developed in 1877 by the German mining engineer Frederick Koepe and was well established in Europe. The Koepe system was particularly suitable in deep mines, such as the Clipstone colliery, where it remained in its original configuration until closure in 2003.

Follow the campaign on the Facebook Page – HERE!

A plan to use Nottinghamshire’s Clipstone headstocks – believed to be among the tallest ever built – as the centrepiece of an activity centre will be submitted to the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Supporters said the £25m scheme would bring investment to a deprived area.

Despite calls for them to be demolished, the Save Clipstone Colliery Headstocks group has spent years building support for plans to convert the surviving buildings into a sports and leisure hub with a mile-long, 100-mph zip wire, tethered parachute jumps and indoor skydiving, the centre would transform the area into a tourist destination.

Denise Barraclough, from the group, said: “This has the potential to be a major part of a big tourist offering in the East Midlands, it has been compared to an Eden Project for the East Midlands”.

With an enterprise zone for businesses and an area for affordable housing, it benefits the area in several ways.

After meetings with Heritage Lottery Fund officials, the group is submitting an initial bid for money to support surveys, business plans and feasibility studies. It is hoped an application for full funding could be finalised later in 2017.

Dr David Amos, who studies the cultural impact of mining said: “It’s an important time to consider the social impact of coal mining. The generation which was directly worked down the mines is getting older and what happens now will help determine how it is remembered.”

See BBC News link – HERE!

 

Mansfield Rd, Clipstone, Mansfield, NG21 9EH

Campaigning for Clipstone
Site Type : Preservation Hub / Campaign
Industry Type : Coal Mining
Features
Reviews
There are no reviews yet, why not be the first?
Leave a Review
You must be to post a review.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Listings