Listing verified as genuine
Posted on 31st January 2018 / 447
Industry Type : Agricultural
Power Type : Water
Public or Private Site? : Public Access, Private Land
Condition : Restored

Clyston Watermill is a working watermill nestled by the River Clyst on the Killerton estate.

It is one of the South West’s last remaining working watermills!

Killerton House and Garden are now run by the National Trust and at the Clyston Watermill you can get a feel for life on Killerton’s wider estate.

Step into the shoes of a miller and discover how flour is still ground today.

The waterwheel used to drive the millstones is a low breast shot wheel, made mainly of cast iron and wooden cogs. It was installed in 1880 by Taylor & Bodley, engineers and millwrights of Exeter – and what a beauty it is!

The wheel is 4.45 metres by 1.47 metres wide (14.5 feet by 5.8 feet) and retains many of its original timber paddles.

The mill building is relatively complete internally, with its original floors and room divisions. Some of the original mill machinery, however, has been moved to Cotehele Mill in Cornwall, another National Trust property.

There are 3 millstones – one pair used to grind course meal for animal feed, and two pairs of French burr to grind finer flour for human consumption. One pair of stones is set up for milling, the other is lifted up to let visitors see how the stones were dressed for cutting grain.

The name Clyston is derived from the Celtic word Clyst, meaning clear stream and the Saxon word Ton meaning town.

The first mention of it was first made in The Domesday Book in 1086, where it was referred to as Clistone/tona mill. It was actually thought to be at a sightly different location to this mill, upstream.

In 1806, Samuel Flood had the mill and a windmill on the other side of the village. In 1859, tenant miller, Richard Burton, was unable to mill flour on many occasions due to the lack of water, so he bought a steam engine from London to power the mill.

In 1862, a fire started and ruined the house, but luckily the mill and its machinery were saved.

It pressed apples from 1915, ground corn into the 1930s and pumped water until the 1940s.

The cider press, apple crusher and some barrels are on display in what was the pump house.

In 1944, the Killerton estate, including the mill was left to the National Trust by Sir Richard Acland. The mill we know today makes 5/6 tons of award winning flour each year. Stop by Killerton’s award-winning restaurant or cafes to taste freshly baked scones and bread, all made with Clyston Mill flour.

Check out their website – HERE!

Although there is some signage to this fine example of a working watermill, if you’re starting from the Village Car Park (which is free) it is not easy to find – however, these TripAdvisor directions should help:
  • Walk from the Broadclyst village Car Park, head for the Red Lion pub near the church with a tower (St John the Baptist).
  • Go through the Church lych-gate and turn right.
  • Walk about 40 yards then turn left (90 degrees) and follow the grass path down (67 yards) to a wooden gate (stiff to open) in the lower hedge/wall.
  • Go through this gate and turn 20 degrees left and walk down (84 yards) to the entrance gate to the back of the mill house.
  • The mill is 127 yards west of the church tower the top of which you can see from the mill courtyard.
  • It’s a 476 yards walk from the free village car park.

 

Broadclyst, Exeter, Devon, EX5 3EW

Clyston Watermill

Clyston Watermill is a working watermill nestled by the River Clyst on the Killerton estate.

It is one of the South West’s last remaining working watermills!

Killerton House and Garden are now run by the National Trust and at the Clyston Watermill you can get a feel for life on Killerton’s wider estate.

Step into the shoes of a miller and discover how flour is still ground today.

The waterwheel used to drive the millstones is a low breast shot wheel, made mainly of cast iron and wooden cogs. It was installed in 1880 by Taylor & Bodley, engineers and millwrights of Exeter – and what a beauty it is!

The wheel is 4.45 metres by 1.47 metres wide (14.5 feet by 5.8 feet) and retains many of its original timber paddles.

The mill building is relatively complete internally, with its original floors and room divisions. Some of the original mill machinery, however, has been moved to Cotehele Mill in Cornwall, another National Trust property.

There are 3 millstones – one pair used to grind course meal for animal feed, and two pairs of French burr to grind finer flour for human consumption. One pair of stones is set up for milling, the other is lifted up to let visitors see how the stones were dressed for cutting grain.

The name Clyston is derived from the Celtic word Clyst, meaning clear stream and the Saxon word Ton meaning town.

The first mention of it was first made in The Domesday Book in 1086, where it was referred to as Clistone/tona mill. It was actually thought to be at a sightly different location to this mill, upstream.

In 1806, Samuel Flood had the mill and a windmill on the other side of the village. In 1859, tenant miller, Richard Burton, was unable to mill flour on many occasions due to the lack of water, so he bought a steam engine from London to power the mill.

In 1862, a fire started and ruined the house, but luckily the mill and its machinery were saved.

It pressed apples from 1915, ground corn into the 1930s and pumped water until the 1940s.

The cider press, apple crusher and some barrels are on display in what was the pump house.

In 1944, the Killerton estate, including the mill was left to the National Trust by Sir Richard Acland. The mill we know today makes 5/6 tons of award winning flour each year. Stop by Killerton’s award-winning restaurant or cafes to taste freshly baked scones and bread, all made with Clyston Mill flour.

Check out their website – HERE!

Although there is some signage to this fine example of a working watermill, if you’re starting from the Village Car Park (which is free) it is not easy to find – however, these TripAdvisor directions should help:
  • Walk from the Broadclyst village Car Park, head for the Red Lion pub near the church with a tower (St John the Baptist).
  • Go through the Church lych-gate and turn right.
  • Walk about 40 yards then turn left (90 degrees) and follow the grass path down (67 yards) to a wooden gate (stiff to open) in the lower hedge/wall.
  • Go through this gate and turn 20 degrees left and walk down (84 yards) to the entrance gate to the back of the mill house.
  • The mill is 127 yards west of the church tower the top of which you can see from the mill courtyard.
  • It’s a 476 yards walk from the free village car park.

 

Broadclyst, Exeter, Devon, EX5 3EW

Clyston Watermill
Industry Type : Agricultural
Power Type : Water
Public or Private Site? : Public Access, Private Land
Condition : Restored
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