Posted on 11th March 2018 / 509
Category : Maritime / Dock / Maritime
Industry Type : Maritime
Public or Private Site? : Private Land

Inchgreen Dry Dock was once Britain’s largest dry dock!

It was opened in 1964, but never met its full capacity.

When Inchgreen dry dock was opened it was affectionately called the Big Dock! It was seen as a new beginning for the area and hoped that its construction would create plenty of work.

For the first 2 years the dock was in full swing, with the large ships of the time wanting to use the facilities there – industrial ships like the 100,000 ton BP tanker ‘British Admiral’ and the ‘Texaco Maracaibo’.

However in late 1966 and without any warning the management announced that the dock would close early the next year. On Wednesday 5th April 1967 the Liquidator was called in and 5 weeks later the Firth of Clyde Dry Dock closed.

Then, Scott’s & Lithgow took over and the first ship to enter the dock was the Lithgow-built ‘Gallic Bridge’ – a 74,000 ton bulk carrier.

The dock is now under threat and its iconic cranes have been smashed down. Check-out the campaign to save Inchgreen Dry Dock – HERE!

Not without kudos – the QE2 was fitted-out here in 1968!

Check out loads more images of the dock with its cranes on Geograph – HERE!

 

 

Inchgreen Dry Dock, Greenock, Clyde

Inchgreen Dry Dock

Inchgreen Dry Dock was once Britain’s largest dry dock!

It was opened in 1964, but never met its full capacity.

When Inchgreen dry dock was opened it was affectionately called the Big Dock! It was seen as a new beginning for the area and hoped that its construction would create plenty of work.

For the first 2 years the dock was in full swing, with the large ships of the time wanting to use the facilities there – industrial ships like the 100,000 ton BP tanker ‘British Admiral’ and the ‘Texaco Maracaibo’.

However in late 1966 and without any warning the management announced that the dock would close early the next year. On Wednesday 5th April 1967 the Liquidator was called in and 5 weeks later the Firth of Clyde Dry Dock closed.

Then, Scott’s & Lithgow took over and the first ship to enter the dock was the Lithgow-built ‘Gallic Bridge’ – a 74,000 ton bulk carrier.

The dock is now under threat and its iconic cranes have been smashed down. Check-out the campaign to save Inchgreen Dry Dock – HERE!

Not without kudos – the QE2 was fitted-out here in 1968!

Check out loads more images of the dock with its cranes on Geograph – HERE!

 

 

Inchgreen Dry Dock, Greenock, Clyde

Inchgreen Dry Dock
Category : Maritime / Dock / Maritime
Industry Type : Maritime
Public or Private Site? : Private Land
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