Posted on 4th December 2017 / 303
Industry Type : Agricultural
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Partially Restored

Market Lane Mill is also known as Kings Garth Mill.

Instead of grinding corn there, you can now buy a pint there!

It stands in the centre of town overlooking Market Lane, sitting right on top of an Anglo-Saxon burial ground. It was a 6-sailed, 8-storeyed mill and it is rumoured that one of the sails fell off onto the road resulting in the rest being removed in around 1868. After this, a gas engine was installed to drive the workings.

The Old Mill was built in 1803 and originally used to grind chalk and barley. It was used to mill chalk (Whiting Mill) up until at least 1860.

  • It was built around 1803 at which point William Gibson was the owner.
  • By 1805 Joseph Chafer had taken ownership, but by 1810 Thomas Marris was the owner, however he lost possession of the mill when he was declared bankrupt in 1812.
  • Up to 1830 Joseph Brown worked the mill and was recorded as a miller and flour dealer.
  • By 1838 David Holdsworth owned the mill, but William Hewson was recorded as the miller and flour dealer.
  • In 1847 Thomas Waddingham took ownership of the mill until 1859 when William Dewey became the owner.
  • In the 1860s E Harding became the owner of the mill, but it was still William Hewson who was the recorded miller until around 1882.
  • William Hewson lived on Holydyke which was very close to the mill. He was the brother of George Hewson who was the miller along Waterside Road. Their father, William, was also a miller.

It ended its working life as a mill sometime around 1950.

During the reconstruction in 1990, an early Saxon burial ground was unearthed. 106 skeletons and various objects including swords and jewellery were found, of which some are now to be found in the nearby Baysgarth Museum.

It has since been turned into a public house!

 

 

Market Lane Mill

Market Lane Mill is also known as Kings Garth Mill.

Instead of grinding corn there, you can now buy a pint there!

It stands in the centre of town overlooking Market Lane, sitting right on top of an Anglo-Saxon burial ground. It was a 6-sailed, 8-storeyed mill and it is rumoured that one of the sails fell off onto the road resulting in the rest being removed in around 1868. After this, a gas engine was installed to drive the workings.

The Old Mill was built in 1803 and originally used to grind chalk and barley. It was used to mill chalk (Whiting Mill) up until at least 1860.

  • It was built around 1803 at which point William Gibson was the owner.
  • By 1805 Joseph Chafer had taken ownership, but by 1810 Thomas Marris was the owner, however he lost possession of the mill when he was declared bankrupt in 1812.
  • Up to 1830 Joseph Brown worked the mill and was recorded as a miller and flour dealer.
  • By 1838 David Holdsworth owned the mill, but William Hewson was recorded as the miller and flour dealer.
  • In 1847 Thomas Waddingham took ownership of the mill until 1859 when William Dewey became the owner.
  • In the 1860s E Harding became the owner of the mill, but it was still William Hewson who was the recorded miller until around 1882.
  • William Hewson lived on Holydyke which was very close to the mill. He was the brother of George Hewson who was the miller along Waterside Road. Their father, William, was also a miller.

It ended its working life as a mill sometime around 1950.

During the reconstruction in 1990, an early Saxon burial ground was unearthed. 106 skeletons and various objects including swords and jewellery were found, of which some are now to be found in the nearby Baysgarth Museum.

It has since been turned into a public house!

 

 

Market Lane Mill
Industry Type : Agricultural
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Partially Restored
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