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Posted on 9th June 2016 / 1017
Industry Type : Transport
Power Type : Steam
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Restored

The Daniel Adamson is believed to be the oldest, operational Mersey-built ship anywhere in the world!

It is a remarkable survivor from the steam age and a most unusual vessel.

The Steam Tug Daniel Adamson is a small, but incredibly powerful canal tug. It was built to tow long strings of barges laden with goods from the inland towns of Cheshire and the Potteries to the seaport at Liverpool.

The twin screw, coal-fired steam tug was built in 1903 at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead by the Tranmere Bay Development Company – a joint venture between Laird and the Liverpool engineering firm of John Jones & Sons.

It wasn’t always known as the Danny! It was initially named the Ralph Brocklebank – after a former chairman of the Mersey Docks & Harbour Board.

It also carried passengers, in the early years, from Ellesmere Port to Liverpool. It later served a short stint for the Navy.

In 1922, after the Manchester Ship Canal was constructed, the tug was acquired for just over £3,000, and her black funnel acquired the Manchester Ship Canal Company’s characteristic two white bands.

Late in 1936, the Ralph Brocklebank was chosen as the official director’s launch. Early that summer she was given a radical refit and the name changed to that of the Manchester Ship Canal’s founding father and first MSCC chairman – Mr. Daniel Adamson.

WW2 brought changes and steam power was being phased-out by diesel.

The Daniel Adamson continued the dual role through the post-war years of entertaining distinguished guests, including military leaders, princes and premiers, and towing. But by the 1960s her towing duties became less frequent.

After a decline and serious deterioration and most splendid full restoration has taken place. We can now enjoy and appreciate the Danny in all its splendour!

The resident berth is at the Royal Albert Docks in Liverpool, near the Maritime Museum, however, it can sometimes be spotted at Ellesmere Port, at their Maritime Museum!

Check out the website to read a detailed history, and to find out where it’ll be – HERE!

Read about the Successful 12 year restoration of the Danny by the Daniel Adamson Preservation Society – HERE!

 

 

The Royal Albert Dock, Liverpool

Steam Tug Daniel Adamson

The Daniel Adamson is believed to be the oldest, operational Mersey-built ship anywhere in the world!

It is a remarkable survivor from the steam age and a most unusual vessel.

The Steam Tug Daniel Adamson is a small, but incredibly powerful canal tug. It was built to tow long strings of barges laden with goods from the inland towns of Cheshire and the Potteries to the seaport at Liverpool.

The twin screw, coal-fired steam tug was built in 1903 at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead by the Tranmere Bay Development Company – a joint venture between Laird and the Liverpool engineering firm of John Jones & Sons.

It wasn’t always known as the Danny! It was initially named the Ralph Brocklebank – after a former chairman of the Mersey Docks & Harbour Board.

It also carried passengers, in the early years, from Ellesmere Port to Liverpool. It later served a short stint for the Navy.

In 1922, after the Manchester Ship Canal was constructed, the tug was acquired for just over £3,000, and her black funnel acquired the Manchester Ship Canal Company’s characteristic two white bands.

Late in 1936, the Ralph Brocklebank was chosen as the official director’s launch. Early that summer she was given a radical refit and the name changed to that of the Manchester Ship Canal’s founding father and first MSCC chairman – Mr. Daniel Adamson.

WW2 brought changes and steam power was being phased-out by diesel.

The Daniel Adamson continued the dual role through the post-war years of entertaining distinguished guests, including military leaders, princes and premiers, and towing. But by the 1960s her towing duties became less frequent.

After a decline and serious deterioration and most splendid full restoration has taken place. We can now enjoy and appreciate the Danny in all its splendour!

The resident berth is at the Royal Albert Docks in Liverpool, near the Maritime Museum, however, it can sometimes be spotted at Ellesmere Port, at their Maritime Museum!

Check out the website to read a detailed history, and to find out where it’ll be – HERE!

Read about the Successful 12 year restoration of the Danny by the Daniel Adamson Preservation Society – HERE!

 

 

The Royal Albert Dock, Liverpool

Steam Tug Daniel Adamson
Industry Type : Transport
Power Type : Steam
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Restored
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