Listing verified as genuine
Posted on 14th August 2015 / 708
Power Type : Steam
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Partially Restored

The Cambridge Museum of Technology has a pair of unique Hathorn Davey pumping engines!

The site used to pump sewage, but has now cleaned up its act!

The Museum is based in Cambridge’s old sewage pumping station, which was closed down in 1968. Up until 1894, untreated sewage was flowing into the River Cam through a network of collapsing and overused sewers, so the pumping station was built.

Housed in the former (and first) sewage pumping station for Cambridge, the museum boasts it’s pair of Hathorn Davey pumping engines (installed in 1894) used to pump the sewage from the well beneath the engines to the sewage farm two miles away at Milton.

These are the only engines of this type still running in the world!

The steam to drive these massive engines was generated by burning the town’s rubbish in sets of destructor furnaces, the rubbish being brought in by horses fed on crops grown at the sewage farm – getting the most out of each stage!

Also as part of the original machinery is a pair of large single cylinder gas engines, which were installed in 1909 to help the steam engines in storm periods and finally an electric pump (installed in 1939) to help further.

The site retains it’s 175ft brick built chimney, as climbed by Fred Dibnah, and is a notable landmark.

It boasts:

  • The pumping station’s original equipment and other engines,
  • 2 Hathorn Davey pumping engines (installed in 1894) to pump the sewage from the well beneath the engines to the treatment plant at Milton. These are the only engines of this type still running in the world!
  • A number of products manufactured by W.G. Pye of Cambridge Letterpress-printing equipment ranging from early hand operated presses to power machinery and Instruments from the Cambridge Instrument Company.

See its official website for juicy visitor information.

 

The Old Pumping Station, Cheddars Lane, Cambridge, CB5 8LD.

Cambridge Museum of Technology

The Cambridge Museum of Technology has a pair of unique Hathorn Davey pumping engines!

The site used to pump sewage, but has now cleaned up its act!

The Museum is based in Cambridge’s old sewage pumping station, which was closed down in 1968. Up until 1894, untreated sewage was flowing into the River Cam through a network of collapsing and overused sewers, so the pumping station was built.

Housed in the former (and first) sewage pumping station for Cambridge, the museum boasts it’s pair of Hathorn Davey pumping engines (installed in 1894) used to pump the sewage from the well beneath the engines to the sewage farm two miles away at Milton.

These are the only engines of this type still running in the world!

The steam to drive these massive engines was generated by burning the town’s rubbish in sets of destructor furnaces, the rubbish being brought in by horses fed on crops grown at the sewage farm – getting the most out of each stage!

Also as part of the original machinery is a pair of large single cylinder gas engines, which were installed in 1909 to help the steam engines in storm periods and finally an electric pump (installed in 1939) to help further.

The site retains it’s 175ft brick built chimney, as climbed by Fred Dibnah, and is a notable landmark.

It boasts:

  • The pumping station’s original equipment and other engines,
  • 2 Hathorn Davey pumping engines (installed in 1894) to pump the sewage from the well beneath the engines to the treatment plant at Milton. These are the only engines of this type still running in the world!
  • A number of products manufactured by W.G. Pye of Cambridge Letterpress-printing equipment ranging from early hand operated presses to power machinery and Instruments from the Cambridge Instrument Company.

See its official website for juicy visitor information.

 

The Old Pumping Station, Cheddars Lane, Cambridge, CB5 8LD.

Cambridge Museum of Technology
Power Type : Steam
Public or Private Site? : Public Access
Condition : Partially Restored
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